Forget About Russia… This NEW Leak ID’s The Real Global Threat And They Want Hillary

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Mainstream media headlines, Democrat Party talking points and presidential debates have been filled with them — suspicions that Russian cyber espionage is somehow behind the avalanche of secrets tumbling down about Hillary Clinton. Claims that the Kremlin is interfering with the presidential election abound on the left, but a draft national security report is sounding the alarm now about a much graver threat to America’s long-term security from another country entirely.

And it just so happens to be a country that has ties to the Clintons going back decades, and is openly favoring her to win the Nov. 8 election.

According to the Washington Free Beacon, a massive offensive by Chinese state security services has penetrated deep into U.S. institutions, accessing national secrets, including plans for any future armed conflict with the People’s Republic of China.

As the Free Beacon reported:

“The United States faces a large and growing threat to its national security from Chinese intelligence collection operations,” states the late draft report of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission.

“Among the most serious threats are China’s efforts at cyber and human infiltration of U.S. national security entities.”

The U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission was established by Congress in 2000 to monitor trade relationships between the two countries and report to Congress annually on their implications for American security. This year’s final report is due Nov. 16. The Free Beacon got an advance copy.

In the 15 years since the commission was established, it has found that Chinese agents from the Ministry of State Security, the People’s Liberation Army, and Chinese Communist Party have been engaged in a continuous series of operations, hacking into secure email accounts, unearthing secret war plans, and gathering information about nuclear weapons and their deployment, the Free Beacon reported.

“Chinese intelligence has repeatedly infiltrated U.S. national security entities and extracted information with serious consequences for U.S. national security, including information on the plans and operations of U.S. military forces and the designs of U.S. weapons and weapons systems,” the report said.

“This information could erode U.S. military superiority by aiding China’s military modernization and giving China insight into the operation of U.S. platforms and the operational approaches of U.S. forces to potential contingencies in the region.”

Now, as diverting as it might be to talk about 11-year-old recordings of Donald Trump in Hollywood bragging like a high school student about women’s nether regions, this is serious stuff. This is related to very real issues of war and peace with what is likely to be the United States’ most important military and economic rival in the 21st century.

The presidential election campaign could use some heavy discussions about issues that actually matter. And China’s preference in that campaign is showing up clearly in the country’s state-controlled media.

In a fascinating piece published by the Washington Post on Thursday, Erin Baggot Carter, an assistant professor at the School of International Relations at the University of Southern California argued that an analysis of Chinese state media showed Clinton is getting much warmer coverage than Republican Donald Trump:

Since May, Chinese propaganda has consistently covered Clinton more favorably, although both candidates have become slightly less popular over time. Clinton’s favorability rating started at 92 percent in May and declined to 77 percent in late October. Trump’s favorability rating started at 79 percent in May and declined to 71 percent in late October.

What makes the piece fascinating, though, is Baggot Carter’s apparent argument that it is a credit to Clinton that China’s official propaganda machine is so tilted in her favor. (Of course, it’s not anywhere near the level of Clinton approval that the private propaganda of the American mainstream media shows, but they’re foreigners after all.)

China favors Clinton because she represents stability, and that’s vital to the country’s rulers due to the deep trade ties between China and the United States, Baggot Carter wrote.

Maybe so, maybe not. The bigger point, though, is that the Free Beacon’s report proves that, trade ties or no trade ties, China isn’t holding back its cyber espionage effort so that, if it comes to it, the country will be able to successfully handle a military confrontation with the United States.

The presidential election campaign could use some heavy discussions about issues that actually matter. And China’s preference in that campaign is showing up clearly in the country’s state-controlled media.

In a fascinating piece published by the Washington Post on Thursday, Erin Baggot Carter, an assistant professor at the School of International Relations at the University of Southern California argued that an analysis of Chinese state media showed Clinton is getting much warmer coverage than Republican Donald Trump:

Since May, Chinese propaganda has consistently covered Clinton more favorably, although both candidates have become slightly less popular over time. Clinton’s favorability rating started at 92 percent in May and declined to 77 percent in late October. Trump’s favorability rating started at 79 percent in May and declined to 71 percent in late October.

What makes the piece fascinating, though, is Baggot Carter’s apparent argument that it is a credit to Clinton that China’s official propaganda machine is so tilted in her favor. (Of course, it’s not anywhere near the level of Clinton approval that the private propaganda of the American mainstream media shows, but they’re foreigners after all.)

China favors Clinton because she represents stability, and that’s vital to the country’s rulers due to the deep trade ties between China and the United States, Baggot Carter wrote.

Maybe so, maybe not. The bigger point, though, is that the Free Beacon’s report proves that, trade ties or no trade ties, China isn’t holding back its cyber espionage effort so that, if it comes to it, the country will be able to successfully handle a military confrontation with the United States.



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